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Final Discussion 0 L. Thompson (Flaugher) Well, here we are, just a few days away from Spring Conference 2013. I truly hope everyone has enjoyed this year's one read So What Do They Really Know by Cris Tovani. Even if you haven't discussed along with us, I hope you've been reading and are ready to welcome Cris to the conference. I have started using a few of the tools from the book as we've been reading. I've shared much more with the classroom teachers I work closely with and I'm working with the middle school Language Arts teacher to implement reading workshop into her classes next year. What are you using or planning to implement from the reading?
by L. Thompson (Flaugher)
Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Chapter 7 - Grading is Killing Me 1 L. Thompson (Flaugher) Cris Tovani discusses hard vs. rigorous in Chapter 7. She explains, "Rigor for one is not rigor for all." Different students with different needs and skills reach their level of rigor with the appropriate scaffolding and modeling. Differentiated rigor is necessary. On page 147 she presents a chart comparing hard and rigorous which is helpful. "So What Do They Know?" has been a great professional read. I'm excited to hear Cris Tovani at spring conference.
by J. Mahaffey
Tuesday, April 9, 2013
Chapter 6 - Feedback That Fortifies 2 L. Thompson (Flaugher) The following article from TeachThought was posted on Twitter. The feedback strategies go along with our One Read conversation. "10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds" http://www.teachthought.com/teaching/10-assessments-you-can-perform-in-90-seconds/
by J. Mahaffey
Saturday, March 30, 2013
Chapter 5 - Annotations: a trustworthy source of data 1 L. Thompson (Flaugher) Another powerful chapter! Lysha, I agree with you, I'm also excited about this simple form of student assessment. We're all aware of using post-a-notes while reading but Cris' explanation of annotating text, as feedback for her, for assessing student thinking and comprehension, puts a new spin on things. She also uses the text annotations for planning her mini-lessons for the next day to guide the needed instruction. Reading how this works for her in the workshop classroom shows how she can help individual students improve their reading and understanding. I also found the one-page annotation sheets she created for all content areas very helpful. These are found on pages 97-100.
by J. Mahaffey
Thursday, March 21, 2013
Chapter 1 Assessment: It Doesn't Have to Be the Enemy 6 L. Thompson (Flaugher) Great!  Here's more we use and a Smart Notebook file that has 4 Consensograms already set up.  I've used them many times in the library.Files attached:3-2-1 Stratey1-Minute PaperConsensogram Smart Notebook
by J. Mahaffey
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Chapter 4 - Off the Field and Into the Classroom 1 L. Thompson (Flaugher) I like the Inner-Voice Sheet the author provides in Chapter 4 however my first thought was, I would not enjoy interrupting my reading of a good book to have to constantly record my thinking. Reading a little further the author addresses this issue. She allows a student who apparently shares my concern, by compromising and allowing him to read and then record his thinking, questions he has, and unfamiliar words. The teacher is still able to see his thinking and determine help the student might need. In the workshop setting a teacher is able to identify students that are lost. If a teacher is lecturing, without gathering feedback from students, students that are lost may be lost day after day until it's too late to help them backup and clear up their confusion. Looking into a student's thinking daily keeps students on track with their learning. The "Conferring Notebook” the author keeps is wonderful. The teachers at my school using the workshop model have streamed lined an Excel sheet they use for this task. I'm always impressed with how much they know about the reading by individual students. "Debriefings are crucial to student learning.” The author uses various strategies for debriefing or allowing students to be metacognitive at the end of the class. The strategies can be whole-class, in pairs, or individual. She uses this feedback to plan the next class lessons. The important question: "How will students show me their thinking so I can better pan for their needs tomorrow?” Great chapter!
by J. Mahaffey
Tuesday, March 19, 2013
Chapter 3 - Game-Time Assessment 1 L. Thompson (Flaugher) What a great chapter! I work very closely with our English Language Arts teachers and have for years. I remember the first year our teachers moved to Writers Workshop and Readers Workshop. I remember the lamenting they did when they made the transition to the workshop model. They talked about how hard it was for them to stop talking so much and give the time for students to work on their own. They talked about how hard it was to train their students to work on their own. The teachers loved the student conference time and found in invaluable, as well as giving students choice in their reading. The first year was the hardest but now, many years later they love everything about it. I love the How to Do a Think-Aloud strategy on page 38 and see its value as we all begin working more with nonfiction to support common core standards or Core Academic Standards as they are called in Missouri. Figure 3.2 on page 40 will be helpful to teachers that would like to begin the model for the first time. Facilitator/coach is a great way to see ourselves as educators. Student feedback is essential and can be obtained during the student conference time. I love that students read, think, and write more with the workshop model!
by J. Mahaffey
Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Chapter 2 - Let's Get Personal 2 L. Thompson (Flaugher) Steven Layne has some fantastic reader interest surveys in last year's one read Igniting a Passion for Reading. 
by L. Thompson (Flaugher)
Tuesday, February 26, 2013
2012: Chapter 9 - author visits! 3 E. Wickham (Gilbert) My usual fee is $150.00 for a presentation but I never charge school or scout groups.  That includes teacher and librarian groups also.  I have published five books about life in Missouri and have several more on the way.  My newest presentation is called Unique Missouri and it is very adaptable for any age group from fourth grade up through adult.  I am booked solid around Missouri Day.  Please check my webpage at  http://www.Missouri-Books.com  .  Thanks. 
by R. Malone
Sunday, August 12, 2012
2012: Chapter 10 - the plan 1 E. Wickham (Gilbert) I want everyone to know the posts have been great!  Though I haven't shared till now I have enjoyed reading.  My main goal as a librarian for preschool, kindergarten and first graders is to share the joy of reading with the children.  I believe students who enjoy reading, will read!  I actually wrote a college paper (about 25 years ago!) with many of the ideas promoted by Mr. Layne, so when I read his book I was thrilled to know there are others who share my passion for instilling that love of reading in children.  I sent an email to all the teachers in my building after only a couple of chapters and recommended the book as a summer read.
by K. Rumker
Thursday, April 19, 2012
2012: Chapter 8 - The party 1 E. Wickham (Gilbert) I especially like the First Read Club and would like to use it with fiction and nonfiction titles. Read Arounds I think would work well with 6th grade students because 6th grade year is their first year to use a middle school library. There are many authors they are not familiar with and this would be a great way to meet them. We have a poetry break planned for this next Monday for our 6th graders. April is poetry month!
by J. Mahaffey
Friday, April 13, 2012
2012: Chapter 6 - Book Discussions 2 E. Wickham (Gilbert) Yesterday I copied and shared Steven Layne's Book Chat Evaluation Rubric on page 95 and 96 with our middle school English teachers and reading teacher. They loved it. It's so well thought out and thorough. Perfect is the word they used after reading through it.
by J. Mahaffey
Friday, April 13, 2012
2012: Chapter 7 - reading lounge 2 E. Wickham (Gilbert) Julie - I love that your kiddos love the reading area and feel comfortable moving the bean bags around to their favorite places!  Does anyone know of a grant source for getting furniture?  Any ideas in MASL-land?  
by E. Wickham (Gilbert)
Wednesday, April 11, 2012
2012: Chapter 4 - reading aloud 5 E. Wickham (Gilbert) My last post should have said, the number 1 way ...   Thanks!
by J. Mahaffey
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
2012: Chapter 5 - Modeling 2 E. Wickham (Gilbert) First, I'd like to share a picture of my "Recommended by Mrs. Mahaffey” tub. I've mentioned in it earlier posts. This is a great way to show students you read and share great books with students. There isn't always time to meet the needs of those individual students that say, "I need a good book, what do you recommend.” My students know they can go to my tub and find a good book and one I can quickly tell them about. High school librarians, if you don't have a recommend tub I hope you start one today. It's one of the best features in my library. At the beginning of each year I give a lesson to 6th grade students titled How to Choose a Just-Right Book and then we work on and revisit this information the whole year. This is sort of like Steven Layne's "Shopping” philosophy. Our lesson really helps our 6th grade students use the middle school library.
by J. Mahaffey
Tuesday, April 10, 2012
2012: time-out for trivia 2 E. Wickham (Gilbert) Awesome Amy!  Thanks also for that extra bit of Truman Trivia :)
by E. Wickham (Gilbert)
Friday, March 30, 2012
2012: It's time to read! 1 E. Wickham (Gilbert) Last week at our Team Leader/Coordinator building meeting, we discussed our Daily Independent Reading Time (DIRT).  Our school-wide reading program was going through a rough period.  More than half of the classrooms weren't reading, kids were using the time for completing homework and missing assignments, and basically just socializing.  But some of the teachers who still treasure DIRT, spoke passionately about what they do in their classrooms.  Here are a few examples:* One social studies teacher described how every student reads every day.  And the teacher models this without exception.  * Another teacher requires her students to read silently three days a week, and she reads one book aloud the other two days.  * And yet another teacher requires his students to read everyday and routinely converses with them to make sure they are reading books of interest (rather than just pretend reading). * And finally, I spend a lot of time helping kids make their own reading lists on Destiny.  After the discussion, I showed them Steven Layne's book - and pointed out that these are some of the same things he advocates for.  Now we just need to do this across the building.  I am looking forward to hearing our keynote speaker.-Barry
by B. Crook
Saturday, March 10, 2012
2012: Chapter 3 8 E. Wickham (Gilbert) Is it, is it, is it?????  I LOVED this chapter because I am a HUGE advocate of read-aloud! 1.  Is there anybody out there that remembers elementary school when you came in from recess and you would put your head down on the desk while your teacher read to you.....then junior high came along and no more read-alouds? 2.  Have any of you ever visited a classroom or stood outside the door of the classroom so you can listen to the teacher during her/his read-aloud?  One particular teacher comes to my mind and I've told her numerous times that I love listening to her and I'll tell her one more time.....keep reading  outloud Mrs. Stevens of CMS! 3.   Very seldom did I NOT start my library classes with a read-aloud...no matter what grade level.  4.  Every year my library would host an author visit and I could definitely tell the differences between the classes that had teachers reading aloud one of the visiting author's books. 5.  I always looked forward to my dictionary unit because before we started I would read aloud  Frindle by Andrew Clements.  I think this book should be given to every future teacher. 6.  I hoping that someday someone will write me a letter like Sharon Draper wrote to her 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Mann. OK......I'm finished.....can you tell this chapter brought  me LOTS  of fond memories?  
by V. Howard
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
2012: Chapter 2 - get ready! 9 E. Wickham (Gilbert) I agree with you. The library should be the best place in the school. I realize that I'm biased--grin. I have done Reading Interest surveys with classes and try to emphasize with the kids that their first concern in finding a book is the story and whether or not it is interesting to them. (and not the points, sigh)
by S. Needham
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
2012: Chapter 1 - Aliterate readers 10 E. Wickham (Gilbert) Giving students books and series that they will like reading is a big step in the right direction and then promoting the books big time.  Having lots of displays and conversations with the kids about the books they are reading and what they like about them helps. If students know that the librarian reads a lot of the books that they like it makes an impression on them.  I've done different things to raise awareness about the books that we have but the most effective are word-of-mouth from other students and the relationship I build with students. 
by S. Needham
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
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